Delhi

After breakfast, we have full day city sightseeing tour of Delhi visiting Red Fort, Jama Masjid, Humayun’s Tomb, Safdarjang Tomb, Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya, Lodhi Tomb and Qutub Minar. Return to hotel for overnight stay.

Red Fort: The Red sandstone walls of the massive Red Fort (Lal Qila) rise 33-m above the clamour of Old Delhi is one of the most magnificent places in the world. The Fort was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in 1838 is a reminder of the magnificent power and pomp of the Mughal emperors. Lahore gate, the main gate of Red Fort attracts a major crowd on each Independence Day.

Jama Masjid: This great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. The highly decorative mosque has three great gates, four towers and two 40 m-high minarets constructed of strips of red sandstone and white marble.

Humayun’s Tomb: This magnificent garden tomb is the first substantial example of Mughal architecture in India. It was built by Bega Begum in 1565 AD, around nine-year later of the demise of her husband Humayun.

Safdarjang Tomb: This is the last enclosed garden tomb in Delhi in the tradition of Humayun’s Tomb and was built in 1753- 54 as the mausoleum of Safdarjung, the viceroy of Awadh under the Mughal Emperor, Muhammed Shah.

Hazarat Nizamuddin Auliya: The Tomb represents to the one of the greatest and most influential Sufi saint of Indian Sub-continent, by whose order Hazrat Amir Khusro (R.a) Invented a new language to break down barriers between south and north India (Including Pakistan, Bhutan, Nepal, Rangoon, Bangladesh and border area of Afghanistan), for better understanding and to serve Humanity in a unified way. Hazarat Nizamuddin was a Sufi far beyond the foundation of time, caste, creed, colour, region or race.

Lodhi Tomb: The tombs of Muhammad Shah and Sikandar Lodhi are good examples of octagonal tombs. Shish and Bara Gumbad are square tombs with imposing dome, turrets on corners and facades giving a false impression of being double storied.

Qutub Minar: Qutub Minar is built by Qutab-ud-din Aibak as a victory tower immediately after the defeat of Delhi’s last Hindu kingdom. This soaring, 73 m-high tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15 m diameter at the base to just 2.5 m at the top. A 7 m-high iron pillar stands in the courtyard of the mosque. It is said that if you can encircle it with your hands while standing with your back to it your wish will be fulfilled.